Research Outputs | Professor Damian Bailey

1. Bailey, D.M., Rimoldi, S.F., Rexhaj, E., Pratali, L., Salmòn, C.S., Vilena, M., McEneny, J., Young, I.S., Nicod, P., Allemann, Y., Scherrer, U. and Sartori, C. (2013). Oxidative-nitrosative stress and systemic vascular function in highlanders with and without exaggerated hypoxemia. Chest 143: 444-451.

First ever human study as part of an international collaboration led by Bailey to demonstrate that impaired systemic vascular function in chronic mountain sickness patients is due to a free radical-mediated loss of nitric oxide subsequent to vitamin C deficiency. This has set the research agenda by providing an alternative treatment strategy (vitamin C repletion through diet and/or infusion) that will reduce their risk of premature cardiovascular disease. Paper led to invited plenary talks at an international conference (International Conference on Environmental Ergonomics, Queenstown, New Zealand, 2013) and 2013 Cheltenham Science Festival (Will humans evolve in the future?)


2. Bailey, D.M., Dehnert, C., Luks, A., Menold, E., Castell, C., Schendler, G., Faoro, V., Gutowski, M., Evans, K., Taudorf, S., James, P., McEneny, J., Young, I.S., Swenson, E., Mairbäurl, H., Bärtsch, P. and Berger, M.M. (2011). High-altitude pulmonary hypertension is associated with a free radical-mediated reduction in pulmonary nitric oxide bioavailability. Journal of Physiology 588: 4837-4847.

First ever human study to measure the rate of free radical exchange across the human lungs during hypoxia which led to invited plenary talks at international conferences (International Symposium on Pulmonary Function in Health and Disease, Giessen, Germany, 2011; Recent Trends and Future Perspectives in High-Altitude Pulmonary Research, Leh, Ladakh, India, 2010).

Resulted in an honorary Fellowship of the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute (first Welshman). Cited in a state-of-the-art review [Beall, C.M. et al. (2011). Free Radical Biology and Medicine 52: 1123-1134], “must read” by F1000Prime (Highlighted Paper) and accompanied by an editorial in the Journal of Physiology.


3. Bailey, D.M., Taudorf, S., Berg, R.M., Lundby, C., Pedersen, B.K., Rasmussen, P. and Møller, K. (2011). Cerebral formation of free radicals during hypoxia does not cause structural damage and is associated with a reduction in mitochondrial PO2; evidence of O2-sensing in humans? Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism 31: 1020-1026.

International collaboration led by Bailey and first ever human study to demonstrate that free radical output by the brain during hypoxia is an adaptive response underlying oxygen sensing. Led to invited plenary talks at international conferences (International Symposium on High-Altitude Tolerance, Heidelberg, Germany, 2013; Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology, Regina, Canada 2012; American College of Sports Medicine, San Fransisco, USA, 2012; Oxygen, Davos, Switzerland, 2011). Paper cited in a state-of-the-art review by one of the World’s foremost authrorities [Scherrer, U. et al. (2012). Current Respiratory Medicine Reviews 8: 123-130] and considered a “Must Read” by F1000Prime (Highlighted Paper).


4. Bailey, D.M., Taudorf, S., Berg, R.M.G., Lundby, C., McEneny, J., Young, I.S., Evans, K.A., James, P.E., Shore, A., Hullin, D.A., McCord, J.M., Pedersen, B.K. and Møller, K. (2009). Increased cerebral output of free radicals during hypoxia: implications for acute mountain sickness?
American Journal of Physiology (Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology) 297: R1283-R1292.

International collaboration led by Bailey and first ever human study to measure the rate of free radical exchange across the human brain during hypoxia leading to invited plenary talks at international conferences (World Congress on High Altitude Medicine and Physiology, Arequipa, Peru, 2010; American College of Sports Medicine, Baltimore, USA, 2010; Society for Free Radicals in Biology and Medicine, Santiago, Chile, 2009).

Cited in a review by Joe McCord, twice nominated for the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine [Lisk, C. et al. (2013). Free Radical Biology and Medicine 63: 264-273] and Cochrane Review [Marti-Caravajal, A.J. et al. (2012). 4.CD009761].