Research Outputs | Dr Kevin A Evans

1. Bailey, D.M., Evans, KA, McEneny, J., Young, I.S., Hullin, D.A., James, P.E., Ogoh, S., Ainslie, P.N., Lucchesi, C., Rockenbauer, A., Culcasi, M. and Pietri, S. (2011). Exercise-induced oxidative-nitrosative stress is associated with impaired dynamic cerebral autoregulation and blood-brain barrier leakage. Experimental Physiology 96 (11): 1196-1207

First ever human study to demonstrate that free radical formation during acute physical exercise is associated with impaired dynamic cerebral autoregulation and corresponding opening of the blood-brain barrier. A novel spin-trap was employed for the first attempt at detecting superoxide formation in human blood. Cited as a “Must Read” by F1000Prime.


2. Bailey, D.M., Taudorf, S., Berg, R.M.G., Jensen, L.T., Lundby, C., Evans, K.A., James, P.E., Pedersen, B.K. and Møller, K. (2009). Trans-cerebral exchange kinetics of nitrite and calcitonin gene-related peptide in acute mountain sickness: evidence against trigeminovascular activation? Stroke 40: 2205-2208.

International collaboration led by Bailey, funded by The Danish National Research Council including funding for Dr KA Evans as a post-doctoral researcher. First ever human study to demonstrate that the human brain loses nitric oxide during hypoxia (including first rate of exchange calculation) and despite widespread speculation, it does not release the headache molecule, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), thereby excluding its role in the pathophysiology of acute mountain sickness arguing against the clinical use of CGRP receptor antagonism.


3. Overgaard, M., Rasmussen, P., Bohm, A.M., Seifert, T., Brassard, P., Zaar, M., Homann, P., Evans, K.A., Nielsen, H.B. and Secher, N.H. (2012). Hypoxia and exercise provoke both lactate release and lactate oxidation by the human brain. The FASEB Journal 26: 3012-3020.

Novel study demonstrating that lactate oxidation during exercise and hypoxia accounts for up to one third of the energy substrate used by the brain, highlighting the likely presence of a cell-cell lactate shuttle involving neurons and astrocytes.


4. Bailey, D.M., Evans, K.A., James, P.E., McEneny, J., Young, I.S., Kewley, E., Fall, L., McCord, J.M., Møller, K. and Ainslie, P.N. (2009). Altered free radical metabolism in acute mountain sickness: implications for dynamic cerebral autoregulation and blood-brain barrier function. Journal of Physiology 15: 73-85.

First ever human study to demonstrate that increased free radical formation during hypoxia is associated with a functional impairment in dynamic cerebral auotregulation. Cited as a “Must Read” by F1000Prime. This landmark paper was cited by over 15 review articles and the seminal textbook (High Altitude Medicine and Physiology, 5th Edition) edited by some of the most eminent specialists in the field (West, J.B., Schoene, R.B., Luks, A.M. and Milledge, J.S.).